Genetic reports
This page will explain how genetic reports received for sequencing with our providers work.

What specific reports can be obtained ?

The future vision and short answer is: Whatever you want to know, based on proven genetic understanding at that time.
With Genomes.io, you own your DNA. You control access to your data and therefore you decide what you want to know, and equally importantly, what you don’t want to know about yourself. We make this easier for you by providing libraries of genetic tests (e.g. personal traits, health risks, wellness traits, carrier status, drug response, etc) on our website, and giving you the option to run these reports on your data should you choose. These tests will only be run when you explicitly grant permission to do so using your Genomes.io mobile app.

Carrier Status report

One of our very first genetic reports is our Carrier Status report. This is a set of reports that gives you information on whether or not you are a carrier for certain hereditary conditions. This type of test can quite easily, and very definitively determine whether you are a carrier for these conditions. If you are a carrier, this will most likely not affect your health, but may affect the health of your children.
To learn more about our genetic reports please read: https://genomes.io/blog/post/our-genetic-reports-explained-7

What else can be read from your genome?

  • Ancestry: DNA variants occur at different frequencies in different places across the world and every maker has its own pattern of geographical distribution. A DNA ancestry algorithm can combine information about these patterns with the unique set of DNA alleles in your genome to estimate your genetic ancestry.
  • Traits and Wellness: Certain traits are genetically linked, meaning your genetics make you more or less likely to express certain traits. These can include earwax type, eye color, fear of heights, alcohol flush reaction, lactose intolerance and even muscle composition. These are based around published scientific literature supporting an association between particular genetic markers and a trait. The version of DNA you have at that genetic marker (your genotype) can impact which version of the trait you are more likely to have.
  • Health risks: There are certain genetic variants that increase your risk of developing certain health conditions. Some of these include Parkinson’s disease, celiac disease, late-onset Alzheimer’s disease, certain breast cancers and age-related macular degeneration. Other factors also affect the chances of developing these conditions (e.g. lifestyle, environment, family history), therefore these tests do not diagnose health conditions, but the results can be used during discussion with healthcare professionals.
  • Carrier status: Certain genetic variants may not directly affect your health but could affect the health of your future family in the form of inherited/hereditary disease. If one of these variants are present in both your and your partner's genome (you are both “carriers”), then your children will have a percentage chance of expressing the condition. E.g. If both parents are carriers for cystic fibrosis (CF), there is a 25% chance that the child will have CF. Understanding your carrier status can help you work with your doctor to prepare for the health of your future family.
  • Pharmacogenomic Report: Pharmacogenomics is the study of how genes affect a person's response to drugs. Certain genetic variants influence the pharmacokinetic (drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination) and pharmacodynamic effects of certain drugs (effects mediated through a drug's biological targets), including Warfarin, Cisplatin, Simvastatin and Abacavir, as well as general drugs like Aspirin. Most drugs currently available are "one size fits all," but they don't work the same way for everyone. However, using an individual's genotype to explain or predict a patient’s response or lack thereof to a treatment, allows for better treatment outcomes, greater efficacy, minimization of the occurrence of drug toxicities and adverse drug reactions.
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What specific reports can be obtained ?
Carrier Status report
What else can be read from your genome?